Level 5 Followership – #TED style

TED Followership Video

I just watched a video from TED that made me think of what I have called a Level 5 Follower, which is an Influencer.  My definition of an Influencer is someone who works to alter strategies or activities that will have a big impact on the organization.  Measures their contribution by the things started and the opportunities to do more.

This video makes me think of the Influencer.  They don’t necessarily always think of the big ideas, but know a good idea when they see it and jump on board with their heart and soul as if it was their own.  Watch the video – – – think a little – – – and probably laugh a lot. 🙂

5 Levels of Followership

Great Followership is a choice – Why it matters

Stay Interviews

Two clear messages from people I respect yesterday.

  1. From a person making sure they keep their best people – They have instituted a process called Stay Interviews where leaders interview people to ask them the simple questions How is your job going? and What are the things that would make you stay here for 5 years?  Leaders talk with people from areas that are not underneath them and their goal is to listen.  The next step is to put all of the information together and decide What is next? based on what they hear. 
  2. From someone needing to recruit to fuel growth of his company – Made the statement that All of the best people are now back working – People can now move if they want to.  Retention of talent has to be at the top of the list.  This is from a high achiever who looks for high achievers. 

Myth – Developing great leaders, engaged workforces, and keeping your best people costs money.

Truth – Talking with people, listening to what is on their mind, sharing what you are thinking/feeling, and following up on action plans is essentially free.  What costs money is hiring the Director of Talent Management to act as a policeman for you/your organization.

Make Stay Interviews a habit (ie.  always ask people How they are doing?/What they need?) and retention will happen.

Friday Fun on Monday – Any other ideas?

I have a friend who is very skilled at creative play.  I always like to see how he translates that skill into the workplace without getting into trouble.  He is successful at that most of the time.

His team likes to laugh so they came up with a game that allowed words or phrases to be banned by the team and then use of those words/phrases cost the individual a one dollar fine.  The process is pretty simple – individuals present the word/phrase  and the team votes.  New words are added an others are taken off the list.  As he told me the stories the joy was overflowing.  I was laughing uncontrollably. 

So far, here are a sample of the words that have been banned: brutal, very nice, baby, and whatever.

Any other simple ways to create a little laughter in the workplace?

Engagement – The One Question to Ask

I have been around the development of people for over a decade, and one thing still surprises me – the reaction of people when asked “What do you NEED?”

In leadership transitions – it is the key question after defining the immediate goals for the role and how success over the first 6 months will be measured.

The Birkman Method assessment measures it, and people are often surprised to see their NEEDs named in the results and how accurate the stress behaviors are defined when those NEEDs are not being met.  Minimizing stress opens up a whole new world of performance and engagement.

Leaders seem relieved when they have the opportunity to tell their teams what they NEED from them to be successful – after hearing the NEEDs of their team.

It is a cornerstone of great Followership.  When we know the needs of our leaders we can help them be successful. 

What is leadership?  is a big question and many resources are poured into helping people be successful at this difficult role.  Remember that it is in the conversations where leadership happens, not in the powerpoint slides or emails. 

Ask the NEED question and agree on one thing that you can make happen.  Are you surprised at what you hear and see in their reaction?  I still like good surprises . . . . . .

Leadership Assistance Program

One day an employee showed up at my office and spent 5 minutes sharing some very personal medical problems.  I listened, and her greatest fear was not about the procedure, but how to tell her actual direct boss because the solution would require her to miss work.  She was worried about losing her job.  I calmed her fears, and she was then able to go have a discussion that she should have had several weeks before, but couldn’t.

This ever happen to you?  While health issues are serious things, it felt good to be a trusted.  It also took me back to some coaching training I had years before that taught me to listen well, and to know where there might be boundaries to be drawn.  Some conversations stay within boundaries, but there are things as leaders that we need to direct people to get help.  Sometimes Leaders need an Assistance Program.

When I was a leading HR in an organization we implemented an employee assistance program.  EAP’s require organizations pay a monthly or yearly fee per employee and the employees and their families have access to basic personal counseling services, referral help for substance abuse issues, career counseling, and other forms of assistance.  It is confidential for the employee, and the employer only gets a report on the number of people who have used it and basic service information.  I remember getting the first usage report and our usage was a couple percentage points above their norm.  In people terms it equated to two individuals receiving help.

I was grateful that those 11 individuals had received the help, and that the leaders of those people had also benefited from this safety net.

Leadership is about being there for your people, and it is also about knowing when you need to get assistance.  Celebrate being asked to be part of a tough conversation, but know the limits of your burdens/responsibilities. 

Gallup research shows people are happier/more engaged if they have 1 to 3 best friends at work. 

Friendships is another form of Leadership Assistance Program – and it is a free.

People are not like plants – how to treat them like people

Plants are not People

I am reminded this time of year of a basic truth in most of us – we like to put our energy into fixing things. I have a vegetable garden, and 5 weeks ago I put seeds into pots and started to grow them indoors. Each morning I look at the progress represented by 22 little pots and only about 5 showing signs of life. Yes, I am not a very good gardener. I only wish the bare pots would tell me what they need.

How does this relate to leadership? Often I go into organizations with the goal of helping a leader look at their team, have a conversation around team potential vs business strategy, help the team members think about their own development needs to meet the strategy, and then leave them with action items/goals to help them successfully hit the targets in the plan. In every team are people that are not growing. Leaders tend to worry about these people and put some direct energy (talking) and lots of indirect energy(worry, frustration) into fixing them.

The traditional solution? Gallup once made the statement “Put most of your energy into your best people”, which also can sound like the GE mantra of ‘cut your bottom 10%”. These statements sell books but implementing is risky and hard for leaders, people, and cultures.

The reality . . . .

Plants are not like people. Plants cannot tell you what they need more of to grow.

People are not plants, they can tell you what they need to be successful if they trust you AND if you ask.

 

The solution . . .

What if in your one on one conversations and performance conversations you asked?  Recently I helped a leader of a small organization implement a performance evaluation that focused on asking – and I call that a performance conversation. He was amazed at what he heard from his people.

People are not like plants, so lets stop treating them like plants . . . . and to some people, stop acting like a plant and blaming the gardener.

Stress and Leadership – Measuring the impact on self, what about others?

A thought hit me several months ago – If being a CEO is such a difficult job (it is), then what the divorce rate is versus other jobs?  As it turns out a study was done, and chief executives had a 40% lower divorce rate than the overall average of all occupations in the study.  Their rate was 70% lower than dancers, bartenders, and massage therapists.  Here is a link to the study. Based on this measure, it can be said that leaders personally handle a lot of stress.

Conversation done?  Not exactly.  In working with teams and leaders I have seen it from another perspective.  What is the effect of a stressed leader on the rest of the organization.  For leadership and team development I use a tool called the Birkman Method.  The advantage I have found in this assessment is that Dr. Roger Birkman has found a way to measure not only surface behaviors, but underlying needs and the stress behaviors that result from needs not being met.  Here is an example.

Many senior leaders I have worked with have a work pace that is very fast, and have a high need for practical and tangible results. The Birkman uses phrases like a need for practical results, opportunities for physical action, and activities that focus on practical results.  When these needs are not met, Birkman describes the stress behaviors as acts without thinking, generates restless tension, and impatient/edgy

While leaders have to be able to handle lots of stress, do these behaviors sound familiar?  What is the impact of these behaviors on a team?  Peer relationships?  An organization?

It is great leaders can handle the stress.  But what about the impact it has on everything else?

Managing Others – Help them Find, Then they will Finish

I was having a conversation with a friend yesterday talking about helping students recognize their talents and become actively involved in picking the right career for themselves.  Then she made a comment with “So many of our students cannot see themselves as good at anything, they are just struggling/focused on finishing.”

How many of our people are just focused on finishing?  Finishing the day.  Finishing this class.  Finishing the work you just gave them.  Finishing their next meal.  Finishing the meeting.  Finishing the phone call.  Finishing is about putting your head down and charging forward.

When I talk to groups about their story as an analogy to their career plan or their next job search I often hear finishing language.  It sounds like – I have never thought of myself at being talented, I work.   I am good at getting things done.  I just need to find a job.  I want my Birkman Method profile to look like theirs.

Everyone is great at something, or has the potential to be.  Help people FIND that, do something with it, and finishing will just happen.

Often during trUYou sessions with leaders, in the middle of reviewing the Birkman assessment something special happens.  They remember what they love or re-find something they need that they stopped asking for after their last promotion.  In one discussion the leader realized they needed time to review what they did and sort through (in order to take tasks off the list) their list of priorities.  I helped them find – then they went and finished.

Be that kind of leader – whether it is leading others or leading yourself (aka: Followership!)

The 5 Levels of Followership

A recent blog posting from Kate Nasser got me thinking.  She made the case that the opposite of leader is not follower.  Here is her post.

I agree with her, but struggle with a word that captures how people work AND facilitates a discussion that allows a leader and follower to share their perception of performance.  I propose the 5 levels, with Kate’s term being level 5.  Yes, I did borrow the concept from Jim Collins, but these are my words.  So here are the Five levels of Followership.

  1. Minimizer   – An individual that consumes oxygen in the workplace.  They are present, but getting things done is not a priority.  They measure their contribution by getting just enough done to stay employed.
  2. Doer – Do what they are asked consistently and with very little negative emotion.  Solid and very dependable.  Measure their contribution by getting done what is asked by when it was asked.
  3. Attractor – Do their job with joy, attracting customers both inside and outside of their organization.  Measure their contribution by the smiles they receive back and the work they get done.
  4. Improver – Does the work presented and looks for ways to improve the efficiency.  Measure their contribution by the dollars/time that they save or the improvements they make in the lives of their customers.
  5. Influencer – Someone who sees opportunities to alter strategies or activities that will have a big impact on the direction of the organization and the work that is being done.  Measure their contribution by the big things they get started and the opportunities they have to engage in work they consider to be significant.

It is always a great conversation to ask people how they perceive their contribution, then compare that with what you see.  Gaps drive more conversations.  Perpetual gaps indicate outcomes of conversations need to be written down.  Words and labels do matter, but great conversations matter more.

Leadership from #Ford: Remember your roots . . Look to the future

As we looked out over the Ford complex they affectionately call The Rouge, my daughter said “It is really cool how they are committed to the environment and creating such a nice place to work”.  My comment back was “Yeah, but remember how dirty and polluted this place used to be.  They ruined air and water for a long time.”  Her response, “But it looks good today.”

We toured the Ford complex in Detroit where they make the F-150 truck, and there is a lots there to talk about.  Ford does a great job sharing the real history (including beating of union organizers) and painting a vision for why this facility means so much to the company and the people.  It is also amazing to watch people build a great product in an extremely clean and nice environment.  Worth the time if you are in Detroit. We live in a knowledge economy, but I still get the chills watching people assembling a physical product.

My big take-away from the tour is how both my daughter and I heard the same message, saw the same things, but initially had a different perspective.  I wanted to make sure she saw the past and she wanted me to see the present and future.  Who is right?

Knowing and acknowledging the past is important.  George Santayana once said Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.  It provides context for decisions today and gives us a strong Why for current direction.  People need leaders willing to talk about history.

Living the in past is a problem.  Constantly reminding people of past sins as a form of punishment or reason for not believing in a future vision is being a bad follower.

Leaders, acknowledge the past and challenge yourself and others not to live in it.  Followers – ditto.  Many thanks to my daughter for reminding me of that.