12 Nuggets of Wisdom from the EOS Community

12 Nuggets of Wisdom from the EOS Community

I believe all leaders should find a group of people outside their business to help them learn and to keep them grounded and away from the head trash thinking of “it is only me that struggles with this.”

My practice as an implementer is to always attend a QCE (Quarterly Collaborative Exchange) with 200+ other implementers from around the globe. Here are some quick quotes that I brought home which I think you will find helpful and maybe funny as you lead your teams. If any trigger a thought for you that you want to kick around, call me or email to set up a time to talk. As my EOS partners, you are my priority!

  1. Remember to explain what LMA means to all your leaders – especially your younger leaders. The reason is that the urban dictionary defines it as Leave Me Alone!
  2. In the absence of data, the brain makes up a story.
  3. If things are happening in a session that aren’t feeling right, the mirror is a good place to start.
  4. You are as young as your future is bigger than your past.
  5. The last 7 years were the greatest 4 years of my life.
  6. What are the 3 things that I love to do?
  7. A lot of entrepreneurs have a fabulous delegation system, it just goes the wrong way.
  8. Entrepreneurs don’t get freaked out about goals, they get freaked out about deadlines.
  9. It is rare that a company hires to replace a visionary.
  10. Lens for your website: What do you want me to do when I come to it? (then evaluate it)
  11. If you are committed to your customers, you make time to call x each day. (What if x=5 for you? – I met an implementer that does this every day!)
  12. The European countries of Belgium and Italy struggle with the open and honest part of EOS because culturally their conflict style is more indirect, so it takes more time. (If you have operations in Europe, I met an implementer that works all over the continent and could help you roll it out well if you need some advice.)

Failure (continuing a thought from Seth Godin)

 Learning from a failure is critical. Connecting effort with failure at an emotional level is crippling. After all, we’ve already agreed you did your best.

Early in our careers, we’re encouraged to avoid failure, and one way we do that is by building up a set of emotions around failure, emotions we try to avoid, and emotions that we associate with the effort of people who fail. It turns out that this is precisely the opposite of the approach of people who end up succeeding.

See entire post from Seth Godin.

Great leaders make lots of mistakes.  They get the title GREAT LEADER because they push through the mistakes and get on with things.  In the end, they make more good/great decisions than bad ones.

I have learned over the years that many of these same leaders had to grow through getting hung up on thinking about some of those bad decisions.  No one really accepts failure with no pain, some just dwell on it less.  In addition, too often their people are still pointing at the bad decision and going “See!” – but doing it secretly.

So how does a leader get through this?  One way is to process bad decisions openly with their team so everyone learns from those choices – including them.  It shows transparency, vulnerability, creates safety for other people to step forward, and teaches people to problem solve and push through.

When I see leaders saying I am sorry and leveraging their team to learn I stop and pay attention.  It takes a special leader to do that and a special follower to allow it.  I like being part of teams like that.